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CLAREMONT INN

Claremont Street today seems like an unlikely thoroughfare to have sported a handful of pubs, but when Queen Victoria was on the throne it certainly did. As many as five pubs and beer-retailers co-existed at one point, although over the years there were probably more.
None now survive as time was called on the Valletort some years ago … and on the Prince Albert, the Oxford, the Hearts of Oak and the Claremont, many years before that. Indeed it seems that the Claremont closed shortly after the end of the First World War, by which time all but the Valletort (which was rebuilt some years later – around 1970) had also closed their doors, or at least left the licensing trade.
Named after the street in which it stood, Claremont would appear to owe its name indirectly to the Earl of Clare who established Claremont in Surrey back in 1714.

LICENSEES
1873 Samuel Rowland
1877 John Broadhurst
1880 Mrs Thomasine Broadhurst
1907 JR Stephens
1911 Daniel May
1914 Mr Thompson
1919 Thomas Trumfield